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Money Politics and Electoral Process in Nigeria: Past and Present Trends and Future Possibilities

 Victor A.O. Adetula and Ezekiel Major Adeyi[1]

 Abstract

The relationship between money and politics is so powerful and has serious implications for democracy. Since the return to electoral politics in 1999, Nigeria's political parties have been severally criticized for their unbridled use of money in politics. Money politics is fast shrinking the political space, becoming a key variable in determining who participates in electoral politics in Nigeria. In this article, we draw attention to some specific questions: What is the historical foundation of the current trend in the use of money in electoral politics in Nigeria? What are the strength and limitations of the existing legal framework for regulating the use of money in electoral politics?  Specifically, we ask whether or not the provisions in the 2006 Electoral Act are sufficient foundation for party finance reform. What is the extent of the influence of other environmental factors such as weak parties, inefficient election management bodies, weak civil society etc.?



[1]Victor Adetula is a Professor of International Relations and Development Studies, Department of Political Science, University of Jos, Nigeria and Ezekiel Adeyi is a Lecturer in the same department.

  

 

The Travails of an Emerging Democracy: The Turbulent 2007 General Elections in Nigeria

 Moses T. Aluaigba[1]

 Abstract

 This article explores and highlights the futile attempts Nigeria has made at the conduct of credible elections and uses empirical data to present overt problems that manifested in Nigeria’s 2007 General Elections. While demonstrating how structural factors such as the ineptitude of INEC and its prejudiced role as an umpire collectively subverted democracy in the conduct of the 2007 elections; it underscores the grave implications of the 2007 electoral tragedy and argues that they threaten Nigeria’s fledgling democracy except the trend is reversed through structural reforms of the country’s electoral process.



[1]Moses T. Aluaigba is a Research Fellow at the Aminu Kano Centre for Democratic Research and Training, Mambayya House, Bayero University, Kano, Nigeria.

 

 

Electoral Administration and the Consolidation of Democracy in Nigeria: An Analysis of the 2007 General Elections

  David Omeiza Moveh[1]

 Abstract

This article is an attempt at analyzing the problematic of electoral administration in Nigeria using the Elklit and Reynolds’s (2000) framework for the analysis of electoral management bodies which builds on a close scrutiny of the electoral management system’s performance through clearly defined stages of the electoral process. Specifically, the article explains some major flaws in the administration of the 2007 general elections in Nigeria and makes a case for strengthening INEC’s institutional capacity.

 


[1]David Omeiza Moveh is a Lecturer in the Department of Political Science, Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Nigeria.

 

 

Education for Development: Interrogating the Development Orthodoxy in Nigeria and the Paradox of Education in National Development

 Abraham Nabhon Thomas[1]

 Abstract

This article qualitatively argues that the inherited Western educational experience, instrumented to actualize the Western development orthodoxy is sustaining and reinforcing a “culture of underdevelopment” in Nigeria; that the extant educational system functions, against expected national goals, to perpetuate the culture of underdevelopment; and that the continued praxis of the extant development orthodoxy and application of policy prescriptions derived there from, would implicate a perpetuation of the culture of underdevelopment. The article proffers the urgent need to critically re-examine the extant development praxis, in line with the cultural and environmental realities in the polity with emphasis on education for national self reliance.



[1]Abraham Nabhon Thomas is a Public Security Consultant in Benin City, Nigeria.

 

 

Poverty, Unemployment and Rise of Violent Crimes in Nigeria between 1999 and 2008

Akubor Emmanuel Osewe[1]

Abstract

After several years of military dictatorship and the eventual return to democracy in 1999, many thought that the problem of poverty and the rising rate of violent crimes which characterized the period of military rule would come to an end. Unfortunately, the situation did not change, as the poverty level increased, so also the rate of violent crimes. With specific reference to assassinations and brutal killings, this article examines how poverty and unemployment, especially among the youth, have boosted the cases of these violent crimes in the country between1999 and 2008. The author of the article is of the view that the long period of military rule, coupled with its attendant unemployment and wide spread poverty nurtured the breeding ground for violent crimes.

 


[1]Akubor Emmanuel Osewe is an Assistant Lecturer in the Department of History, Gombe State University, Gombe, Nigeria.

 

 

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